The house, originally built in 1890, had a mishmash of internal alterations, with many of the period details removed.  Our brief, both in design and decoration, was to create a contemporary, light filled, family home, without losing the original soul of the house.  We stripped the interior back to subfloor and raw plaster and reorganized the floor plan improving room proportions, balance and flow.

 

Decorative elements relevant to the period were restored, although pared back, giving them a modern edge.  New openings were made to maximize natural light & connection to outdoors, most notably, a dramatic 6 metre high window, filling the mid point of the house with natural light and providing an ever changing back drop for the staircase leading to the first floor. The rear was completely reconfigured and extended to create a large open plan living / dining area with new kitchen, butler’s pantry, powder room & cellar access.

Huge glass doors, designed to be hidden in the wall cavity, create flow onto the terrace and a pavilion feel to this “new” back room, that has been inserted into the building under the existing roofline.  Flush veneer panels, consistent with joinery throughout, reveal "hidden" entrances to the cellar and powder room, a playful design gesture to enhance the experience of using these spaces. Carefully considered pendants bring a modern elegance to the lighting of the period rooms.  Interesting retained features, such as brass chimes from the original door bell remain hanging in the hallway and exposed brick from the early 1900’s forming  two of the walls in the underground cellar, reference the home’s history.

 

Materials such as American Oak flooring, dark wood veneers for the custom joinery, smoked grey mirror, painted white walls, grey linen sheers, natural stone and black window & door hardware are used consistently and are simple, timeless finishes that radiate a calmness throughout the home.  Period details exist harmoniously with a modern aesthetic.  Custom joinery, artwork, personal collections, furnishing and natural stone infuse the interior with colour, texture and visual interest, forming a cohesive layer across two different architectural eras.   

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Extensive restoration and renovation of an Edwardian House.

Edwardian House